Khalil Mack is always a quiet guy in front of the media. Such is his personality. He’s more about actions than words. This isn’t a problem for Chicago Bears fans. However, one could definitely see a glint of emotion in his eye when questions during his latest press conference turned to the 100th anniversary celebration he attended last weekend.

That was where he got a chance to meet Bears legend Richard Dent. This is one of the all-time great pass rushers in NFL history. He retired with 148 sacks in his career and holds the single-season Bears record with 17.5. He was one of the primary driving forces behind those dominant defenses from 1984 to 1988. A man who helped inspire new generations of pass rushers.

Apparently, Mack was one of them. The two got together during the festivities in Rosemont and ended up speaking for a half hour. During that time Mack gained a greater appreciation of how great Dent was.

Khalil Mack took home valuable tips from “Sack Man” Dent

Mack already knows a ton about how to rush the passer, but he’s not so cocky as to think he knows everything. Dent has reached heights he hasn’t quite yet. So taking any sort of advice is never a bad thing. Mack was asked what his scouting report was of the Bears legend after meeting him and watching him on film.

“Dominant. Dominant force. He had an edge, man. The things that he showed me? Exactly what he did. Same things. Just understanding angles and understanding…he’d tell me about this basketball. How you check up somebody on basketball and kind of put his elbow on somebody. It’s the same thing I saw on the field.”

He was then asked if he planned to use some of that stuff on the field.

“Hell yeah.”

That’s the last thing the rest of the NFL needs. Mack starting to use techniques from Dent. As if the Bears All-Pro wasn’t dangerous enough as it is. Could this end up being a career year for him? All signs point towards Mack making every effort for that to be the case. Perhaps that longstanding record of 17.5 sacks may finally be in danger after 35 years.