Mitch Trubisky has met and spoken with Peyton Manning on several occasions. He seeks advice from the future Hall of Famer whenever possible, trying to learn everything he can about being a great quarterback. So it seems rather fitting that the young Bears signal caller is suffering from certain issues that even Manning himself dealt with back in his early days.

Trubisky didn’t have the debut many had hope for up in Green Bay. After a strong start in the first half, it seemed like he went into a shell in the second. Green Bay adjusted their coverages and Trubisky lacked a sense of aggression. He was jittery in the pocket and a little too quick to run at times.

Quarterbacks coach Dave Ragone recognized the issues and didn’t seem overly concerned. More understanding that this would likely be part of the growth process. He noted that one of Trubisky’s best attributes also might be taken a bit far at times.

“What you appreciate about him is he’s not trying to force the ball in bad situations. He’s very meticulous about taking care of the football, which allows you to stay in games. But there’s also times where it’s clear out of the clutter, and you have a chance to take a shot. Take your shot and if it doesn’t work out, it doesn’t work out.”

Manning went through the same realizations as Mitch Trubisky

This is nothing new for young quarterbacks. They typically come in one of two ways:  overly aggressive or overly cautious. Trubisky comes from the latter group, as did Manning when the Colts drafted him. Manning had learned in college to never throw unless a guy was open. This would avoid turnovers. He quickly learned though that there are vast differences between the meaning of “open” in college and “open” in the NFL.

That’s the adjustment that Trubisky hasn’t made yet. It’s not that he can’t see the openings. It’s more that he doesn’t think they’re open enough and would rather go to another progression. What the Bears are trying to teach him is that he must learn to both trust his fundamentals and his natural accuracy while also trusting that his wide receivers will make a play for him if the throw isn’t perfect.

That comes with practice and time. Manning took the advice to heart but threw 26 interceptions through his first 16 games. Eventually, though he figured it out and the rest is history. Trubisky just needs to get there too. Presuming people give him the time to do so.